Socratic method in the apology

The defence of Socrates[ edit ] Socrates begins his legal defence by telling the jury that their minds were poisoned by his enemies, when they the jury were young and impressionable. That his false reputation as a sophistical philosopher comes from his enemies, all of whom are malicious and envious of him, yet must remain nameless — except for the playwright Aristophaneswho lampooned him Socrates as a charlatan-philosopher in the comedy play The Clouds BC.

Socratic method in the apology

Socrates (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

If they do, this proves to the person that their original position had been inconsistent, and in the end, they are wiser than they were before, because they have been made aware of their own ignorance. The so-called "Socratic method" is a means of philosophical enquiry, wherein people are interrogated about what they have said and subsequently worked through several related questions to see if they contradict themselves.

In Apology, Socrates lays out this method to the Athenians using a number of examples. He describes how a friend had approached the Oracle at Delphi to ask if any man were wiser than Socrates, and he had been told that no man was wiser.

Socrates tells how he then began to seek out people reputed to be very wise, and determined that their reputations were unjustified by forcing them to confront their own inconsistencies. When Socrates is found guilty, he goes on to use the Socratic method to question the wisdom of his being put to death.

After all, he argues, nobody knows whether death is a blessing or a curse; consequently it would be inconsistent of the jury to put him to death with the intention of punishing him.This translation of Socrates' Apology is from Benjamin Jowett.

Socratic method - definition of Socratic method by The Free Dictionary The Oracle replied that there were not!!! Upon being told of this answer Socrates maintained that this implied that he, alone, had this claim to wisdom - that he fully recognised his own ignorance.
SparkNotes: The Apology: Summary The Socratic method is one of the most famous, least used, and least understood teaching and conversation practices. His father was Sophroniscusa stone cutter, and his mother was Phaenaretea midwife.
Socratic method - Wikipedia The Latin form elenchus plural elenchi is used in English as the technical philosophical term. According to Vlastos, [5] it has the following steps:
Socratic Method Research Portal The extant sources agree that Socrates was profoundly ugly, resembling a satyr more than a man—and resembling not at all the statues that turned up later in ancient times and now grace Internet sites and the covers of books.
The Wisest Man Alive The Latin form elenchus plural elenchi is used in English as the technical philosophical term. In Plato's early dialogues, the elenchus is the technique Socrates uses to investigate, for example, the nature or definition of ethical concepts such as justice or virtue.

You can read the text as a PDF here. By asking a series of clarifying questions, the Socratic Method leads the learner to find a clear and concise expression of knowledge by way of their own reason.

The dialogues of Plato’s Socratic period, called “elenctic dialogues” for Socrates’s preferred method of questioning, are Apology, Charmides, Crito, Euthyphro, Gorgias, Hippias Minor, Ion, Laches, Protagoras, and book 1 of the Republic.

While the Apology is more of a speech than a dialogue, there are multiple examples of the Socratic method. First, he describes how he went about understanding a declaration of the oracle at Delphi.

The Apology of Socrates // Digital Essays // God and the Good Life // University of Notre Dame

Socrates refers to this "Socratic method" as elenchus. The Socratic method gave rise to dialectic, the idea that truth needs to be approached by modifying one's position through questionings and exposures to contrary ideas.

In Apology, Socrates lays out this method to the Athenians using a number of examples. He describes how a friend had approached the Oracle at Delphi to ask if any man were wiser than Socrates, and he had been told that no man was wiser.

Socratic method in the apology

This is the only instance in The Apology of the elenchus, or cross-examination, which is so central to most Platonic dialogues. His conversation with Meletus, however, is a poor example of this method, as it seems more directed toward embarrassing Meletus than toward arriving at the truth.

Socratic method - Wikipedia